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You are reading: Parental influences drive young people’s educational aspirations

Written by Sinan Gemici, Alice Bednarz, Tom Karmel and Patrick Lim

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The authors examine factors that influence young people’s plans to complete Year 12, their aspirations to commence university study in the first year after leaving school and their expected occupation at age 30. They also examine the extent to which the occupational aspirations of teenagers align with their actual job outcomes a decade later. The findings in this report demonstrate just how important parents and peers are in relation to young people’s aspirations. The findings also indicate that the aspirations of 15-year-olds are somewhat unrealistic. By age 25 years, which is the age until which data are available for analysis, a significant portion of young people fall short of what they set out to achieve occupationally. However, this does not mean that they cannot achieve their desired occupations at a later stage in life.

Parental influences drive young people’s educational aspirations

Gemici, S., Bednarz, A., Karmel, T., & Lim, P. 2014. Parental influences drive young people’s educational aspirations, NCVER, Adelaide.