The Australian Centre for Student Equity and Success acknowledges Indigenous peoples as the Traditional Owners of the lands on which our campuses are situated. With a history spanning 60,000 years as the original educators, Indigenous peoples hold a unique place in Australia. We recognise the importance of their knowledge and culture, and reflect the principles of participation, equity, and cultural respect in our work. We pay our respects to Elders past, present, and future, and consider it an honour to learn from our Indigenous colleagues, partners, and friends.

Back to Research

RMIT University

/home/acses/acses.edu.au/www/wp/app/themes/acses/img/component5.svg
RMIT University
Filters
Clear all
Equity Group
Equity Initiatives Framework Classification
Lead organisation
Publication Type
Focus
Year published
3 items found
Pathways or Goat Tracks – Non-ATAR University Entrance
This research report fills research gaps around how young people find out about pathways into further education and future careers, including alternative non-ATAR pathways into university and pathways to vocational education.
Examining geography as a predictor of students’ university intentions: a logistic regression analysis
The key aim of this article is to investigate if, and to what extent, distance predicts students’ intentions to attend university. Over 9400 Australian students are included in the analysis. Findings indicated students from provincial areas were significantly less likely to report intent to study at university when compared with metropolitan students. Remote students were less likely to report an intention to attend university than students in the metropolitan category.
Access to higher education: Does distance impact students' intentions to attend university?
Data analysis indicates distance is a predictor of students’ intentions to attend university, net of selected demographic and socio-economic variables. This report applies statistical modelling and geo-mapping to existing data, contributing to current literature as well as indicating an ongoing advancement from discrete categorisation to continuous measures of students’ distance from higher education providers.